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Ep. 503: John Miller Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

John Miller
John Miller

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John Miller, author of “QBQ: The Question behind the Question”, is on today’s podcast. John’s message is all about person responsibility. His dad was the wrestling coach at Cornell University and he taught John the foundation for his way of thinking early on.

What could I have done different? How could I have done a better job? These are just a couple questions John tells people to ask themselves before they try and pass blame onto someone else. John shares a personal story of someone going above and beyond in their service. This story is referred to as “The coke story.” He shares it with every audience he speaks in front of because it is the perfect example of someone going above and beyond. John says that people need to rise above situations, swallow pride, and fix problems even if it wasn’t their mistake to fix.

Next, John shares what he did before writing books and doing speaking engagements. He was bored and depressed working behind a desk. Michael asks, “Even in a bored and depressed state, did you ever have a victim mentality in your psyche?” John shares another personal story about him shutting down an entire branch of his company (for good reason) so he could move locations and be in a more positive place. He says that he has always been proactive in how he looks at a situation. He gives a few “rule of thumb” phrases to try and stay away from: Whenever you ask “Why me”, that is falling into a victim mentality. “When” questions are typically linked to procrastination. “Who” questions seek culprits or people to pass blame onto. Ask questions that contain an “I” in there because “I” can only change me.”

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • Staying accountable for your actions
  • Social media bullying and accountability
  • Stress is a choice
  • Asking yourself the right questions to stay accountable
  • Entitlement

“Accountable people don’t blame others, and they don’t even blame themselves.” – John Miller

“People who win fall forward.” – John Miller

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Ep. 471: Emma Seppala Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Emma Seppälä
Emma Seppälä

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Emma Seppala is today’s guest. She is author of “The Happiness Track: How to Apply the Science of Happiness to Accelerate Your Success.” She is the Associate Director for the Center of Compassion at Stanford University. Emma’s work isn’t based on theories or common knowledge, there is a tremendous amount of neuroscience backing her work.

Emma starts the podcast off stating that being happy is a very subjective experience. With that in mind, in general, happiness is divided into two main categories; hedonic and eudemonic. Hedonic happiness doesn’t last long and is more associated with short burst of excitement such as sex and food. Eudemonic is much longer lasting and is more associated with self-fulfillment. Emma goes into depth explaining and giving example of both forms of happiness.

Michael asks Emma to talk about the myth of success next. Emma says Americans are over stimulating themselves, and believing that running on adrenaline is the best way to get things done. Chronic stress is actually what we are embracing and it starts to deplete our immune system. Emma acknowledges that you may not be able to control the world around you, but you can control your state of mind. Working on Stanford’s campus, Emma has seen first hand the severe epidemic of students buying into myths of happiness, especially on higher achieving campuses. They believe the only way to be successful is to burn themselves into the ground and of course, this notion is completely false. Unplugging and taking more vacations is the best way for us to reach our maximum potential. Creativity and happiness in the workplace depends on it.

Next, Emma discusses the impact breathing has on our emotions. There are different breathing practices that help out with stress and anxiety. Nurturing more calmness in our life helps us manage our energy much more. There was a study done at Harvard that showed our brains wonder 50% of the time. However, science shows that we are never happier than when we are in the moment of now. With technology constantly at our fingertips, it is getting harder and harder to be in the present moment. But when we are in the moment, it boosts our charisma and happiness. People are drawn toward others that are satisfied being in the present moment with them. Michael and Emma turn the conversation to negative emotions. These emotions make us more focused on ourselves and selfish. When the focus shifts to positivity, authenticity is created. Others crave authentic people they can connect to. They finish on talking about creativity and how to best tap into the creative parts of your brain. Just by making small changes in the way you work can really make a huge difference in the way your feel and your brain works.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • Benefits of happiness
  • Stresses in life
  • Controlling your mind
  • Happiness in college
  • Cultivating resilience
  • Tapping into the opposite of fight or flight response
  • Impact of different breathing techniques
  • Living in the moment of now
  • Authenticity
  • The flow state
  • Activating creativity

“Self criticism is basically self sabotage.” – Emma Seppala

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Ep 433: Catherine Stott Interview with Michael Covel on Trend Following Radio

Catherine Stott
Catherine Stott

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Michael Covel interviews Catherine Stott. Catherine is author of, “Hypnotrading: A practical guide to using hypnosis and NLP to improve your trading performance: Self-hypnosis and psychotherapeutic techniques for traders.” Catherine believes that hypnotherapy and neuro-lingustic programing can help traders defeat inner challenges and become more successful. She got started working with traders after helping a friend, who happened to be a trader. He helped her understand the world of trading a bit more throughout their sessions and this ignited her interest deeper. She has been helping traders for years but didn’t start HypnoTrading until 2014.

Catherine was working as a psychologist when a friend referred her to see a hypnotherapist. She started to see the hypnotherapist for stress relief in her work and personal life. She was intrigued by the therapy so much that she switched career paths and sought training as a hypnotherapist. Hypnosis is essentially being in a deeply relaxed state of mind. It is an open state of consciousness, but you are fully in control of your thoughts. The first time Catherine experienced hypnosis she found it incredibly relaxing, and thought “I can’t believe that just happened, why haven’t I done this before?” Catherine dives deeper in the different steps she goes through in her sessions to get people in that relaxed state.

When Catherine trained as a hypnotherapist, part of the training was in NLP. Hypnotherapy and NLP are two different practices buy when used together they can be very powerful. An example of using the two fields together would be to associate pain with a color or a shape. It gives the client a way to view pain in a tangible way. They are able to think about that pain as an object that can be picked up and taken out of their body.

Michael moves on to asking, “How do different trading styles play into how you treat patients?” Catherine explains that there are certain universal techniques in hypnotherapy. When it comes to traders, the goal is to find the right trading style that works for them. There are many methods of trading and people should find the one that fits their personality. For example, some people are not built to use a strategy with precise rules and vice versa, some are not cut out for the fast pace of day trading.

Lastly, Michael and Catherine dive into the idea of modeling and goal setting. Modeling is a process of looking at other people and what they do, and essentially modeling that. One way to change yourself for the better is to mimic others who are successful in the field you are trying to master. It is a way of seeing what your results will look like. Modeling helps refocus. The majority of people may not have the chance to get next to a great trader, but everybody can get close to those insights through the written word or videos online. Find people that reflect your values and the style of trading that you want to achieve. There are thousands of trading books out there; you need to weed out what will work for you. Break down what you want to achieve and how you are going to achieve it. Defining your goals and how you want to achieve them is key.

In this episode of Trend Following Radio:

  • Stress vs. anxiety
  • Meditation vs. hypnosis
  • Being in a relaxed state
  • Negative self talk
  • Fear of success
  • Modeling
  • P-A-C-E-R
  • Luck and expectation
  • Defining goal setting

“It’s about your experience rather than your academic ability, and your drive and thrive for learning and achieving.” Catherine Stott

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Harvard Yoga Scientists Find Proof of Meditation Benefit; Trend Following Benefit Too

Trading can be taxing on emotions. Hard on health. Anxiety can arrive. The good news? There is a proactive health process you should consider right along with your position sizing algorithm:

Scientists are getting close to proving what yogis have held to be true for centuries — yoga and meditation can ward off stress and disease.
John Denninger, a psychiatrist at Harvard Medical School, is leading a five-year study on how the ancient practices affect genes and brain activity in the chronically stressed. His latest work follows a study he and others published earlier this year showing how so-called mind-body techniques can switch on and off some genes linked to stress and immune function.

While hundreds of studies have been conducted on the mental health benefits of yoga and meditation, they have tended to rely on blunt tools like participant questionnaires, as well as heart rate and blood pressure monitoring. Only recently have neuro-imaging and genomics technology used in Denninger’s latest studies allowed scientists to measure physiological changes in greater detail.

“There is a true biological effect,” said Denninger, director of research at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, one of Harvard Medical School’s teaching hospitals. “The kinds of things that happen when you meditate do have effects throughout the body, not just in the brain.”

The government-funded study may persuade more doctors to try an alternative route for tackling the source of a myriad of modern ailments. Stress-induced conditions can include everything from hypertension and infertility to depression and even the aging process. They account for 60 to 90 percent of doctor’s visits in the U.S., according to the Benson-Henry Institute. The World Health Organization estimates stress costs U.S. companies at least $300 billion a year through absenteeism, turn-over and low productivity.

Seinfeld, Murdoch

The science is advancing alongside a budding “mindfulness” movement, which includes meditation devotees such as Bill George, board member of Goldman Sachs Group and Exxon Mobil Corp., and comedian Jerry Seinfeld. News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch recently revealed on Twitter that he is giving meditation a try.

As a psychiatrist specializing in depression, Denninger said he was attracted to mind-body medicine, pioneered in the late 1960s by Harvard professor Herbert Benson, as a possible way to prevent the onset of depression through stress reduction. While treatment with pharmaceuticals is still essential, he sees yoga and meditation as useful additions to his medical arsenal.

Exchange Program

It’s an interest that dates back to an exchange program he attended in China the summer before entering Harvard as an undergraduate student. At Hangzhou University he trained with a tai chi master every morning for three weeks.

“By the end of my time there, I had gotten through my thick teenage skull that there was something very important about the breath and about inhabiting the present moment,” he said. “I’ve carried that with me since then.”

His current study, to conclude in 2015 with about $3.3 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health, tracks 210 healthy subjects with high levels of reported chronic stress for six months. They are divided in three groups.

One group with 70 participants perform a form of yoga known as Kundalini, another 70 meditate and the rest listen to stress education audiobooks, all for 20 minutes a day at home. Kundalini is a form of yoga that incorporates meditation, breathing exercises and the singing of mantras in addition to postures. Denninger said it was chosen for the study because of its strong meditation component.

Participants come into the lab for weekly instruction for two months, followed by three sessions where they answer questionnaires, give blood samples used for genomic analysis and undergo neuro-imaging tests.

‘Immortality Enzyme’

Unlike earlier studies, this one is the first to focus on participants with high levels of stress. The study published in May in the medical journal PloS One showed that one session of relaxation-response practice was enough to enhance the expression of genes involved in energy metabolism and insulin secretion and reduce expression of genes linked to inflammatory response and stress. There was an effect even among novices who had never practiced before.

Harvard isn’t the only place where scientists have started examining the biology behind yoga.

In a study published last year, scientists at the University of California at Los Angeles and Nobel Prize winner Elizabeth Blackburn found that 12 minutes of daily yoga meditation for eight weeks increased telomerase activity by 43 percent, suggesting an improvement in stress-induced aging. Blackburn of the University of California, San Francisco, shared the Nobel medicine prize in 2009 with Carol Greider and Jack Szostak for research on the telomerase “immortality enzyme,” which slows the cellular aging process.

Build Resilience

Not all patients will be able to stick to a daily regimen of exercise and relaxation. Nor should they have to, according to Denninger and others. Simply knowing breath-management techniques and having a better understanding of stress can help build resilience.

“A certain amount of stress can be helpful,” said Sophia Dunn, a clinical psychotherapist who trained at King’s College London. “Yoga and meditation are tools for enabling us to swim in difficult waters.”

Thanks to Gary Percy for the find. My yoga? See pics on FB.

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