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Trend Following Is Not “Eyeballing”

When do I enter and exit? When do trend followers know it is the right time to enter or exit? Some feedback:

Michael, how do you know when a trend starts, and when a trend ends? I’m not asking for your precise signals, but you never mention that somewhere in your writings or student presentations there actually is some precise signal for entering and a precise signal for exiting. And what are the signals for confirming that a trend is in existence? I would feel much better about you if you just said that you did indeed have proprietary signals for the existence of a trend, a signal for entering, a signal for exiting, and that you impart this to your students. I hope you won’t say that you just eyeball a trend and make a judgement without signals as to the entry and exit.
Thanks.

You have read chapter 5 of my book The Complete TurtleTrader? It is a system walk through with entries/exits. Yes, my systems/training at www.trendfollowing.com has exact entry/exits. In terms of trend existence–a trend can never be measured or properly known until after an exit signal. There is no eyeballing in the trend following world. This is about systems.

Nicholas Darvas: Trend Trader

From a Time Magazine article in 1959:

Darvas places his buy orders for levels that he considers breakout points on the upside. At the same time, he places a stop-loss sell order just below his buy order, so that if the stock does not move straight up after he buys, he will be sold out and his loss cut. “I have no ego in the stock market,” he says. “If I make a mistake I admit it immediately and get out fast.” Darvas thinks his system is the height of conservatism. Says he: “If you could play roulette with the assurance that whenever you bet $100 you could get out for $98 if you lost your bet, wouldn’t you call that good odds?” If he has a big profit in a stock, he puts the stop-loss order just below the level at which a sliding stock should meet support. He bought Universal Controls at 18, sold it at 83 on the way down after it had hit 102. “I never bought a stock at the low or sold one at the high in my life,” says Darvas. “I am satisfied to be along for most of the ride.”

I can’t recall the last time the financial press reported that a 1959 Time Magazine article might actually be good for one’s portfolio health.

Learn more about Nicholas Darvas trader here

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