“He Was a Ra-tard” (Shout to Zach Galifianakis)

Mark Hulbert pens some of the best mindless drivel seen in a while:

“Fortunately, a disappointing first half does not automatically doom the second half of the year. A clue to this comes from just anecdotal evidence. Take 2009, for example, when the market lost ground for the first six months. Yet the second half of the year witnessed one of the strongest rallies in recent memory. To be sure, poor first halves have not always been followed by such pleasing reversals. There have been plenty of other years in which poor first halves were followed by poor second halves as well. But the historical record shows there is a largely random relationship between the market’s performance in the first and second halves of each year.”

Got those marching orders? Now move out men and women…there is money to lose!

Note: context.

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3 thoughts on ““He Was a Ra-tard” (Shout to Zach Galifianakis)

  1. If we take the nominal value of the average tempurature in Morocco on days ending in Y, divided by the number of windows in the Empire State Building, plus the monetary value of the beers drunk by Cliff and Frasier (but not Norm) on “Cheers” converted into 1956 British pounds, cube that and divide by the number of deities present in the ancient Egyptian religion, the answer is obviously to “short Turkish Lira!” Now, how much to short, well that equation is simple, you just take…..

  2. Mark obviously thinks the exposive rise from the March 2009 lows to June 2009 was a down period. I can’t speak too harshly about Mark because he ranked my Newsletter 7th in the country for the year 2008, which was the worst year for the market since the Great Depression.

  3. Jim Rohrbach-

    Let me take this chance to congratulate you on being smart enough to take the concept of trend following and disguise it as a “black box” indicator so that you don’t have to tell people how you really make your decisions. You were probably among the first to figure out that it was the best way to convert people looking for predictions to the concept of trend following… by hiding the fact that you are a trend follower behind a “magic” indicator.

    (I’m not being sarcastic… I really do admire it!)

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